The “Not me!” Problem

The “Not me!” Problem

In the modern 21st century, crime and theft have shifted, but a lot of people are approaching the problem with logic from a decade ago. We can likely all agree that modern prevention is annoying. Remembering 24 different passwords, four PIN numbers, having to install updates all the time (some of which break what you use daily), this new regulation, that new requirement - it's frustrating. It's funny, though, how it's not at all frustrating or inconvenient to most of us to remember the code for the door, the alarm code for the alarm panel next to the door, the secret password to tell the alarm company when you don't get out in time and alarm goes off, the passcode to our phone, the front-door keypad lock at home, the garage code, the other garage code... You get the idea.

This logic is based on a time when the threat that was more "real" to us was someone threatening our families in the middle of the night or robbing the house while we were at work. In 2017, those types of threats were statistically not what's most prone to happen to a person. Fraudulent credit card and banking charges are much more likely to directly impact you than a thief in the night. Loss of business data for the purpose of identity theft and other crime, as well as identity theft itself, is a big threat to you now. In fact, was happening at three times the pace that home burglaries occur in the US, according to a 2016 study by U of Kentucky.

It's important to avoid the "Not me!" approach to this shift. I talk to businesses all the time who say, "I'm too small for anyone to want to steal my data" or "I have a good firewall, hourly backups, and a great IT support partner - no one will steal my files" or "I don't have anything sensitive." Truth be told, businesses with under 100 employees are the low-hanging fruit for cybercrooks - yes, that's a lot of us! Understand that it can happen to you, and approach all aspects of physical and electronic security with the attention they deserve in our modern business world.