It’s Safe To Remove Bloatware

Like it or not, device manufacturers LOVE to stuff your brand-new PC, tablet, or phone full of “free” applications (they get paid to do it, so there's a slim chance of getting one without a side of spamware - aka bloatware). But clutter is the enemy of a speedy PC, and outdated apps are a breeding ground for hackers; so if you’re not using a particular software on a regular basis, it’s best to REMOVE it completely.

If You Installed It, You Need To Update It!

There are thousands of hackers who get up every morning with ONE goal in mind: to find a new vulnerability in a commonly installed software (like Adobe, Flash or QuickTime) to access your computer. That’s why these companies frequently issue patches and updates for KNOWN security bugs; and once a KNOWN vulnerability is announced via a patch, hackers get to work like crazy trying to figure out how to use the vulnerability and access those users who are lazy about installing updates.

Protecting Your Business From Data Disasters

Data is everything to a small business in this day and age – which means if you lose access or control of your data, you lose everything.

As dramatic as that might sound, the data backs that up. According to several sources, 93% of companies, no matter how big they are, are out of business within one year if they suffer a major data disaster without having first formulated a strategy for combating it.

The DANGERS Of File Sync Apps

If you’re using Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive, or other consumer-grade file sync and sharing cloud applications, listen up! These applications pose a huge threat to your company because company data can be spread far and wide without central oversight of what information is being shared with whom.

Use Bookmarks To Visit LEGITIMATE Websites

Here’s a sneaky trick used by many hackers: they purchase and set up a fraudulent website that is a close misspelling of a legitimate one. Example: www.faceboook.com (extra “o”) or www.dropbox.net (instead of .com). All you have to do is accidentally fat-finger ONE letter in the URL and up pops a very legitimate-looking fake copy of the site you were trying to get to – and the login and links are full of keylogger malware and virus landmines waiting for you to click on them.